Tuesday, April 7, 2009

What the Critics Had to Say about Take Me Out


...Unlike other comedies on "America's great pasttime," TAKE ME OUT takes a serious, "through a glass darkly" look at the sport. Here a tough, but sensitive [player], well played by Carlos M. Gonzales, has a tough time keeping problems down when his star player happens to be black and homosexual. Jason George plays the intellectual athlete with poise and humor. Steve Kubick is his "merry" accountant who gives TAKE ME OUT its best moments with a penetrating monologue on "The Game." Dave Hotstream as an up and coming star from the bigoted backwoods is the catalyst for the play's strongest action.

Glenn Meche directs it all with a firm hand in a velvet glove, especially in scenes where the game of the diamond becomes a metaphor for democracy and - fair play.

- Al Shea, "Steppin' Out", WYES, Channel 12, New Orleans


With a good director like Glenn Meche, and lots of creative imagination, a company can take a play produced elaborately...in New York...and strip (no sarcasm intended) it down to its barest set requirements...Add creative, effective lighting and sound effects, show-casing a well-rehearsed cast of a few good, and some excellent, actors, and one can end up with a fine successful show about baseball...That's exactly what our town's stage wise and much loved Donald "Donnie Jay" James and the To Do Productions Company has done!...

With a compelling script that tries to make a mesmerizing metaphor between baseball and democracy - and also turns baseball into a Zen or mystical experience, Take Me Out is a hit in more ways than one...

Carlos Gonzalez was wonderful as the intelligent and tolerant member of the team, Kippy Sunderstrom. With a wonderfully believable baseball player squint, he captured the character of a compassionate, funny, and loving man as he presented his points to his teammates and the audience with a tolerant humanity...

Jason Goerge was Darren Lemming, the half white and half African American uber-athlete who decides to "come out as gay" to the world, believing that as an always protected super sportsman out fielder he need not fear anything. Mr. George was stunning as he does the role of the desired handsome and well-hung super baseball player, and you get to see it all emotionally and physically...

David Hotstream was Shane Mungitt, who must be a born actor because he gave a compelling, finely tuned performance as the red-necked pitcher (also well-hung and handsome). His character is also a homophobic racist from Arkansas-Mississippi-Tennessee who comes from a shattered past of orphanages and violence; and brings chaos to The New York Empires' Garden of Eden...

Steve Patrick was well cast as Skipper and William Danziger - each role a polished cameo. Marten Johnson was Martinez, Joe Roybal was Rodriguez, Chris Schlumbrecht was Jason Chenier, Duck Tennant was Toddy Koovitz, Gemayel Holloway was Davey Battle, Alphonse Bladergroen was Takeshi Kawabata, and Steve Kubik was Mason Marzac; and all of these actors supported the team effort - baring it all - some in raw emotions - some in the raw all-together. Each actor successfully created his own polished moments that illuminated their characters or an important point in the play...

Mr. Marzac does not get nude, but makes up for it with a subtle scene stealing...interpretation of his role as a nerdy, gay, financial advisor to the rich super athlete lead. Mr. Marzac is heart-felt and funny as he discovers baseball, big bats, and other things in this play which will appeal to the salacious as well as the sagacious in anyone who enjoys a good show!..

Don McDonald was the very creative Lighting and Sound Director whose work really helped make this play a knockout among low-bucks productions...Great praise goes to everyone affiliated with this production who bared their handsome bodies and souls in a well done play which was nearly faultless. Not to be missed!!!


- Patrick Shannon, Ambush Magazine

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